All posts by GM Tax

2018 UK Tax Returns Late Filing Penalties – £10.00 per day penalties to be avoided

Should you have missed the 31 January 2019 filing deadline you will have automatically received a late filing penalty of £100.00.

If your return is still outstanding as at 30th April 2019 a further penalty of £300.00 will be incurred and £10.00 daily penalties will commence from 1st May for up to 90 days or until submitted.

Act now to avoid incurring additional late filing penalties, we at GM Tax can assist you with your electronic submission of your UK Tax Return.

How do I register for Self Assessment

Should you need to lodge a UK Tax Return with HMRC and this is your first time you will need to register for Self Assessment, how you do so depends on your circumstances. You can use a form SA1 if you need to register but you’re not self-employed. For example, if you:

* become a company director

* receive income from land and property in the UK whether you are a tax resident or a non tax resident

* have taxable foreign income of more than £300 a year

* receive yearly income from a trust or settlement

* sell shares as a tax resident or sell a residential property as a non resident or tax resident or other assets liable to Capital Gains Tax

* have yearly income over £100,000

* have untaxed income that can’t be collected through your PAYE tax code

* have income over £50,000 and you or your partner carry on receiving Child Benefit payments

* have Capital Gains Tax or Income Tax to pay

Please contact an office local to you should you require any assistance with your UK Tax Return or registering for Self Assessment or alternatively you can submit an online enquiry via our website.

 

Retired In Australia and receiving a UK pension?

Retired In Australia and receiving a UK pension?

Learn more as to how MoneyCorp can help you make the most of your pension benefits in Australia.

As many retirees living overseas we know that the fixed income of a pension can sometimes mean that budgets are tight and you are often caught by FOREX fluctuations – but if you’re receiving a pension from the UK, there are ways that you can make the most of your hard-earned money. Using a foreign exchange specialist rather than your high street bank to convert your pounds into dollars could make a significant difference to the amount of dollars that arrive in your account.

Please refer to the link below to see how MoneyCorp can assist you.

Download

Save time and automate your regular international payments

There are many reasons why ex-pats need to send money abroad on a regular basis, from property maintenance or child support, to less frequent costs like tuition fees. Automatic payments via a Regular Payment Plan mean that all your bills get paid on time, and you can save yourself the time it takes to organise them each month.

Most of us are used to automatic payments – from electricity and phone bills to subscription and membership services – very few people sit down to settle their bills on a monthly basis. Many people are not aware that you can use the same facility for Ainternational payments, and this can be a convenient alternative to checking rates and transferring money each time a payment is due. While this can all be done online relatively quickly, you still need to remember to make the payments and ensure that any currency you convert covers the required costs.

If you opt for a Regular Payment Plan (RPP), you can fix the amount of currency received or debited, or both if youchoose to lock-in the exchange rate. You can fix these payments for up to two years. This means that you can becertain that any required payments will be covered, and if you are receiving a pension payment from the UK you can budget ahead with confidence whatever happens to the exchange rate.

You can set these payments up over the phone or organise them wherever you are by accessing your account online and via the moneycorp app. The Regular Payment Plan offers convenience and great value, and provides an easy way to manage your funds across borders with a full clear statement as a record of all your payments.

Article courtesy of Moneycorp.

Moneycorp is a reference to TTT Moneycorp Pty Limited which is registered in Australia (business number 116612858). Its principal place of business is Level 15
Exchange Tower, 2 The Esplanade, Perth WA 6000, Australia. TTT Moneycorp Pty Limited is authorised to deal in foreign exchange contracts and buy/sell quotes
to retail and wholesale clients as an Authorised Representative (reference number 445555) of Rochford Capital Pty Limited (AFSL License No. 361276).

Landlord tax: an overview of the changes to buy-to-let tax relief

From 6 April 2017, the government made changes to the way landlords are taxed in the UK. These landlord tax changes will be phased in over the next four years and will not be applied at the full rate straight away – allowing landlords to take necessary action over time.

Who will the changes affect?

These changes will only affect landlords in the list below who have a mortgage for their rental property.

* Any UK resident individual who lets a residential property in the UK or overseas

* Any non-UK resident individual that lets a residential property in the UK

* An individual who lets residential property in partnership with others

* Trustees of a trust directly holding UK residential property

NOTE: These tax changes will not apply to landlords of furnished holiday lets and commercial properties.

What do the landlord tax changes mean for me?

Restricted tax relief on mortgage interest payments

The main change being made under the new tax rules, is that landlords will no longer be able to fully claim tax relief on their mortgage interest payments – so this change will only affect landlords who have a mortgage and not those who own their property outright.

However, the majority of buy-to-let landlords have an interest-only mortgage.

Currently, landlords can deduct allowable expenses and mortgage interest payments from their rental income and pay tax on the difference.

But from April 2017, landlords will only be able to claim tax relief at the basic rate of 20% on whichever figure is lower:

* Finance costs – including mortgage interest payments, loan repayments, overdrafts

* Profit from your rental income – calculated as rental income less allowable expenses

* Total income – calculated as anything other than savings and dividend income above the personal allowance after deducting losses and tax relief

NOTE: In most circumstances, the finance costs will be the lowest figure. But it’s important to highlight that it’s not just mortgage interest payments that will be used to calculate tax relief, but the lesser of the three figures above.

See below as to how the landlord tax changes:

The tax relief that landlords of residential properties get for finance costs is being restricted to the basic rate of Income Tax. This is being phased in from 6 April 2017 and will be fully in place from 6 April 2020.

How the tax reduction is worked out;

The reduction is the basic rate value (currently 20%) of the lower of:

* finance costs – costs not deducted from rental income in the tax year (this will be a proportion of finance costs for the transitional years) plus any finance costs brought forward

* property business profits – the profits of the property business in the tax year (after using any brought forward losses)

* adjusted total income – the income (after losses and reliefs, and excluding savings and dividends income) that exceeds your personal allowance

The tax reduction is not able to be used to create a tax refund.

If the basic rate tax reduction is calculated using the ‘property business profits’ or ‘adjusted total income’ then the difference between that figure and ‘finance costs’ is carried forward to calculate the basic rate tax reduction in the following years.

You are still able to deduct some of your finance costs when you work out your taxable property profits during the transitional period. These deductions will be gradually withdrawn and replaced with a basic rate relief tax reduction:

Tax Year Percentage of finance costs deductible from rental income Percentage of basic tax rate reduction
2017/2018 75% 25%

2018/2019

50%

50%

2019/2020

25%

75%

2020/2021

0%

100%